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Winner of £6,000 Clive Ranger Welsh Cake revealed

Mary Sullivan from Canton has been revealed as the winner of the Clive Ranger Welsh cake, valued at over £6,000.

The luxury Welsh cake was baked by four-store diamond specialist Clive Ranger and new Welsh start-up Mary Margaret Mix, to celebrate St David’s Day.

The one-of-a-kind cake was decorated with cubic zirconia and topped with a .71 carat pure Welsh gold solitaire ring worth £6,250.

People were invited to enter the prize draw for a donation to charity and the winning ticket was drawn at an in-store event, which took place yesterday evening. The giveaway raised almost £300 for Marie Curie Cancer Care.

Winner, Mary Sullivan said: “I saw the Welsh cake in the shop window last week. The ring is stunning and I thought it would make a lovely present for one of my daughters so I stopped by on Thursday morning to pick up a ticket for them each.”

Clive Ranger managing director Richard Slack commented: “We wanted to do something fun for St David’s Day while also raising money for a good cause, so we came up with the idea of creating the most expensive Welsh cake the world has ever seen.

“The cake itself, which was on display in our window during the week running up to March 1, attracted a lot of attention, with people stopping to have take look at this traditional Welsh delicacy transformed into a sparkling gem.

“We were overwhelmed by the success of the giveaway - the shop was full to bursting - and we’re delighted to be able to make a donation of £295.71 to Marie Curie Cancer Care.”

Richard Slack managing director of Clive Ranger with winner Mary Sullivan

Richard Slack managing director of Clive Ranger with winner Mary Sullivan

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Thomas Sabo

Fast Facts on
Wedding rings

  • 860 AD:The year Christians started using rings in marriage ceremonies.
  • 4th:The finger the ring is placed on.
  • 2,200BC:The year of the oldest recorded exchange of wedding rings in ancient Egypt.
  • 1854:The year in which the manufacture of 15ct, 12ct and 9ct became legal.

Photo from William Cheshire